Contract - Cracking the Code: Permit Processing as a Spiritual Journey

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Cracking the Code: Permit Processing as a Spiritual Journey

26 May, 2010

-By Bob Chisholm, FAIA, chairman of the board, R.E. Chisholm Architects



How many times have you had your project “held up” at the building department?

All of us are in agreement that building codes and permits are necessary to protect the health, safety, and welfare of our citizens. At the same time, we could ask any professional architect or engineer (a/e) to provide narrative on frustrating accounts with our regulatory process from incompetent to vindictive. It is a fact that the licensed (and legally liable) a/e must be knowledgeable in the using building codes and provide well executed, code-complaint documents for building permit processing, period.  

On the other hand, it is also a fact that the building official and/or building plans reviewer (not legally liable) must be trained and knowledgeable in reviewing plans, the building code, and provide any interpretation or comments and defer to the professional a/e to respond and complete the submission to the objective approval of the reviewer.

So, why does this not happen as smoothly as the concept above? Continue reading at TalkContract.com



Cracking the Code: Permit Processing as a Spiritual Journey

26 May, 2010


How many times have you had your project “held up” at the building department?

All of us are in agreement that building codes and permits are necessary to protect the health, safety, and welfare of our citizens. At the same time, we could ask any professional architect or engineer (a/e) to provide narrative on frustrating accounts with our regulatory process from incompetent to vindictive. It is a fact that the licensed (and legally liable) a/e must be knowledgeable in the using building codes and provide well executed, code-complaint documents for building permit processing, period.  

On the other hand, it is also a fact that the building official and/or building plans reviewer (not legally liable) must be trained and knowledgeable in reviewing plans, the building code, and provide any interpretation or comments and defer to the professional a/e to respond and complete the submission to the objective approval of the reviewer.

So, why does this not happen as smoothly as the concept above? Continue reading at TalkContract.com
 


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