Contract - Perspectives: Anurag Nema, nemaworkshop

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Perspectives: Anurag Nema, nemaworkshop

27 December, 2010



Anurag Nema
nemaworkshop, founder
New York

What inspired your career choices?
When my parents were designing our home in India, they worked with an architect, who was a close friend of theirs. I remember going to his office and being absolutely fascinated by the whole environment—the books, the drawings, the models. I knew then that this was something I had to be part of.

What is the most fulfilling part of your job?
The most exciting part is the ideas and concepts. I love researching and using everything in my daily life as a tool for design. Design responds to such a wide range of disciplines, including music, nature, film, cuisine, art, fashion, theater, psychology, architecture, pop culture, and politics. Basically, everything is fair game for designers.

What do you consider to be your greatest professional achievement?
I’m still working on it. Perhaps it’s in the next idea, next concept, next project.

What would be your dream project?
I dream of designing hotels and airport lounges. Addressing the traveler is so seductive because he is inherently vulnerable. The question is: how can the design make someone feel comfortable and welcome in a foreign environment? That’s really what hospitality is about—helping someone feel a personal connection, a sense of belonging. Also, I would love to do installations and events because they are opportunities to experiment with something new.

What is the best thing you’ve learned in the past 10 years?
Overdesigning—doing too much without a solid idea—just screws things up.

What do you consider to be the worst invention of the past 100 years?
Artificial materials—fake finishes, fake everything.

What are the biggest challenges facing designers today?
It’s such an exciting time to be a designer. I view constraints and challenges as opportunities. They give structure and relevancy to designs.

If you could have selected another career, what might you have been?
Hard to say—maybe an inventor. Honestly, I really can’t see myself doing anything besides architecture and design.

What advice would you give to A&D students or those just starting out in the field?
Delay judgment. Take an idea and push it. Develop it first and then sit back and decide whether or not it’s relevant. More often than not you will find that even simple ideas thoughtfully considered can be inspiring designs.

What would you like to leave as your legacy?
Inspiration.




Perspectives: Anurag Nema, nemaworkshop

27 December, 2010


Anurag Nema
nemaworkshop, founder
New York

What inspired your career choices?
When my parents were designing our home in India, they worked with an architect, who was a close friend of theirs. I remember going to his office and being absolutely fascinated by the whole environment—the books, the drawings, the models. I knew then that this was something I had to be part of.

What is the most fulfilling part of your job?
The most exciting part is the ideas and concepts. I love researching and using everything in my daily life as a tool for design. Design responds to such a wide range of disciplines, including music, nature, film, cuisine, art, fashion, theater, psychology, architecture, pop culture, and politics. Basically, everything is fair game for designers.

What do you consider to be your greatest professional achievement?
I’m still working on it. Perhaps it’s in the next idea, next concept, next project.

What would be your dream project?
I dream of designing hotels and airport lounges. Addressing the traveler is so seductive because he is inherently vulnerable. The question is: how can the design make someone feel comfortable and welcome in a foreign environment? That’s really what hospitality is about—helping someone feel a personal connection, a sense of belonging. Also, I would love to do installations and events because they are opportunities to experiment with something new.

What is the best thing you’ve learned in the past 10 years?
Overdesigning—doing too much without a solid idea—just screws things up.

What do you consider to be the worst invention of the past 100 years?
Artificial materials—fake finishes, fake everything.

What are the biggest challenges facing designers today?
It’s such an exciting time to be a designer. I view constraints and challenges as opportunities. They give structure and relevancy to designs.

If you could have selected another career, what might you have been?
Hard to say—maybe an inventor. Honestly, I really can’t see myself doing anything besides architecture and design.

What advice would you give to A&D students or those just starting out in the field?
Delay judgment. Take an idea and push it. Develop it first and then sit back and decide whether or not it’s relevant. More often than not you will find that even simple ideas thoughtfully considered can be inspiring designs.

What would you like to leave as your legacy?
Inspiration.

 


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