Contract - A Fine Winery: Trinchero Family Estates expands with a new hospitality center by BAR Architects and Erin Martin Design

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A Fine Winery: Trinchero Family Estates expands with a new hospitality center by BAR Architects and Erin Martin Design

20 December, 2010

-By Jennifer Thiele Busch


The Trinchero family has been a fixture in Napa Valley since 1947 when brothers John and Mario Trinchero purchased the Sutter Home Winery in St. Helena, Calif. They also go down in history as the developer of the White Zinfandel varietal in 1975—an innovation that involved equal parts accident, luck, and creativity, and resulted in the rapid growth of the Sutter Home label. But as the winery has continued to expand in the decades since, its very deliberate growth strategy has focused on design in addition to fermentation.

Trinchero family member Bob Torres, principal and senior vice president of operations for Trinchero Family Estates, and himself an architect, explains that while Trinchero is the sixth largest winery in the world and offers 23 different brands across all price points, the family’s premiere label is Trinchero Napa Valley, which was developed to pay homage to the legacy of founder Mario Trinchero. “We wanted to honor our grandparents with a high-end, luxury wine,” Torres says. “It first came out in 1995, but it didn’t resonate with having a sense of its own place.” The 2007 acquisition of a talented young winemaker named Mario Monticeli and the purchase of a new property, Folie á Deux Winery, just north of St. Helena, afforded the family the opportunity to raise the profile of the label to a new quality level with a state-of-the-art production facility (Phase I) that has the capacity to produce 50,000 cases of wine per year, a hospitality and culinary center (Phase II) that is open to the trade and employs a full-time culinary staff, and a public visitor center (Phase III, unbuilt). Torres turned to BAR Architects in San Francisco to help turn the vision into a reality.

Jeff Goodwin, a principal at BAR, recalls that in addition to showcasing the Trinchero brand, the directive for the new hospitality center was that it reflect both the Italian heritage of the wine-making family and its long-standing relationship to Napa Valley. “The idea was to use simple architecture to create a casual and comfortable elegance,” says Goodwin. “It was not screaming for alternative architecture that one might expect to find in the Valley.” The hospitality center, in particular, had a mandate to feel more or less like a private home, with a suitable reception foyer and living room for entertaining guests, an exhibition kitchen where guests—mostly buyers from restaurants and cruise lines—can sample and discuss food and wine pairings with the chef, and a variety of indoor and outdoor dining spaces. The dining spaces included a simulated wine cave experience in the cellar.

“We’re not flashy people,” adds Torres. “Yet we didn’t want something Old World traditional either. This is a very agricultural county, so we wanted an early California agrarian look. We wanted it to look like Napa Valley.” Nevertheless, Torres sought something architecturally unexpected for the winery itself. “Originally the trusses were to be heavy timber, but everyone has done that,” he says. Instead, the design solution integrates elegant steel trusses in the ceiling of the production facility. “The steel trusses pay homage to my grandfather, who was born in 1899, when steel was used as an architectural element.”

BAR partnered with local Napa interior design firm Erin Martin Design, which successfully brought the necessary touch of early California farmhouse to the 10,800-sq.-ft. hospitality center. “The goal was to tell a story without words,” says Erin Martin. “The family is humble and extremely generous, offering Manhattans and great Italian dishes to their guests, whether doing business or not. The space is a bit of a conversation from the past that is relevant now and hopefully for many more generations to come. The spaces are for entertaining and educating the trade and those lucky enough to be invited in. It truly is more of a home than a commercial space.”

According to Torres, Martin’s involvement helped the design team exceed expectations for the hospitality center. “Jeff and his team programmed that space, but something was still missing. Erin’s interior design—the furniture the finishes, the lighting—made Jeff’s design pop,” he says. “We entertain customers there for all the brands, and they are blown away. That’s what you need to do in this business. A sense of place enhances the value and image of the wines you make.”

who
Project: Trinchero Napa Valley. Owner: Trinchero Family Estates. Architect: BAR Architects; Jeff Goodwin, AIA, LEED AP, principal; Shaowen Chou, LEED AP, associate; John Imhoff, project manager; Marcus Mueller, project architect. Interior designer: Erin Martin Design; Erin Martin, principal; Maria Franchi; Robin Denver. Contractor: Facility Development Corporation. Lighting consultant: MLS Arch-Light Design. Engineers: Summit Engineering, Inc. (civil); KPFF Consulting Engineers (structural); TEP Engineering, Electrical Ray E. Slaughter & Associates (mechanical+HVAC). Kitchen: Castino Restaurant Supply. Landscape: Jonathan Plant & Associates, Inc. Winery Systems: MAC Powell. Photographer: Doug Dun, BAR Architects; Douglas Sterling, Douglas Sterling Photography.

what
Brick: Endicott Brick, Manganese Iron spot. Pendant chandeliers, dining table, exterior lanterns: Custom design by Erin Martin, available through Martin Showroom. Dining Chairs: Orkney Chairs from Mimi London Cellar. Casework: Lewis & Williams. Corner chair: Orkney Chair from Mimi London. Walls, ceiling, fireplace: Expert Plastering Inc. Wood ceiling beams: Hand finished by Antique works. Wood floors: First, Last, & Always. Area rug: Woven Accents Lanterns from Antiques on Old Plank Road. Sandblasted glass: Glass Interiors. Rustic table: Blackman Cruz. Large resin pendant lights from Spain: available through Martin Showroom. Massive steel hood: Ferrous Inc. Limestone tile: Haussmann Natural Stone. Backsplash island countertop: Calacatta Marble Island & wall treatment: Nantucket Bead board “V” groove. Kitchen wall tile: Dale Tile. Stools: Matis Stool from Blackman Cruz. 19th century counter: Donna Parker Habitat. Outdoor chairs: Sutherland. Chai fabric Outdoor Coffee Tables: Stacked Redwood Benches designed by Erin Martin, available through Martin Showroom. Bench Cushion: Perennials Fabric. Metal Benches: Ray’s Custom Ironworks. Lounge chairs: Ralph Pucci, Jens Risom. Sofa: Axel Vervoordt Elliot Sofa.Wood Coffee Table: Martin Showroom. Conference chairs: Holly Hunt Leather. Custom conference table: Mick Handley. Area rug: Merida Meridian. Walls, ceiling: Expert Plastering Inc. Antique iron chandelier: rewired from Martin Showroom. Regency picture lights: Urban Archeology. Rope chandelier: Martin Showroom. Steel fireplace: Ferrous Inc. Upholstery: Back to Basics.Reading lights: Holly Hunt. Statue: “The Brothers” by Simon Toparovsky. Easel floor lamp: J.F. Chen. Studded Floor Lamp from Martin Showroom. Mid-century chair: Hampton Antique Galleries II.

where
Location: St. Helena, CA. Total floor area: 24,000 sq. ft. (winery production building); 10,800 sq. ft. (hospitality center). No. of floors: 1 + mezzanine (winery); 2 (hospitality center). Average floor size: 19,750 sq. ft. (winery production level); 7,450 sq. ft. (hospitality main level). Cost/sq. ft.: $450 (winery); $500 (hospitality center).



A Fine Winery: Trinchero Family Estates expands with a new hospitality center by BAR Architects and Erin Martin Design

20 December, 2010


Douglas Sterling

The Trinchero family has been a fixture in Napa Valley since 1947 when brothers John and Mario Trinchero purchased the Sutter Home Winery in St. Helena, Calif. They also go down in history as the developer of the White Zinfandel varietal in 1975—an innovation that involved equal parts accident, luck, and creativity, and resulted in the rapid growth of the Sutter Home label. But as the winery has continued to expand in the decades since, its very deliberate growth strategy has focused on design in addition to fermentation.

Trinchero family member Bob Torres, principal and senior vice president of operations for Trinchero Family Estates, and himself an architect, explains that while Trinchero is the sixth largest winery in the world and offers 23 different brands across all price points, the family’s premiere label is Trinchero Napa Valley, which was developed to pay homage to the legacy of founder Mario Trinchero. “We wanted to honor our grandparents with a high-end, luxury wine,” Torres says. “It first came out in 1995, but it didn’t resonate with having a sense of its own place.” The 2007 acquisition of a talented young winemaker named Mario Monticeli and the purchase of a new property, Folie á Deux Winery, just north of St. Helena, afforded the family the opportunity to raise the profile of the label to a new quality level with a state-of-the-art production facility (Phase I) that has the capacity to produce 50,000 cases of wine per year, a hospitality and culinary center (Phase II) that is open to the trade and employs a full-time culinary staff, and a public visitor center (Phase III, unbuilt). Torres turned to BAR Architects in San Francisco to help turn the vision into a reality.

Jeff Goodwin, a principal at BAR, recalls that in addition to showcasing the Trinchero brand, the directive for the new hospitality center was that it reflect both the Italian heritage of the wine-making family and its long-standing relationship to Napa Valley. “The idea was to use simple architecture to create a casual and comfortable elegance,” says Goodwin. “It was not screaming for alternative architecture that one might expect to find in the Valley.” The hospitality center, in particular, had a mandate to feel more or less like a private home, with a suitable reception foyer and living room for entertaining guests, an exhibition kitchen where guests—mostly buyers from restaurants and cruise lines—can sample and discuss food and wine pairings with the chef, and a variety of indoor and outdoor dining spaces. The dining spaces included a simulated wine cave experience in the cellar.

“We’re not flashy people,” adds Torres. “Yet we didn’t want something Old World traditional either. This is a very agricultural county, so we wanted an early California agrarian look. We wanted it to look like Napa Valley.” Nevertheless, Torres sought something architecturally unexpected for the winery itself. “Originally the trusses were to be heavy timber, but everyone has done that,” he says. Instead, the design solution integrates elegant steel trusses in the ceiling of the production facility. “The steel trusses pay homage to my grandfather, who was born in 1899, when steel was used as an architectural element.”

BAR partnered with local Napa interior design firm Erin Martin Design, which successfully brought the necessary touch of early California farmhouse to the 10,800-sq.-ft. hospitality center. “The goal was to tell a story without words,” says Erin Martin. “The family is humble and extremely generous, offering Manhattans and great Italian dishes to their guests, whether doing business or not. The space is a bit of a conversation from the past that is relevant now and hopefully for many more generations to come. The spaces are for entertaining and educating the trade and those lucky enough to be invited in. It truly is more of a home than a commercial space.”

According to Torres, Martin’s involvement helped the design team exceed expectations for the hospitality center. “Jeff and his team programmed that space, but something was still missing. Erin’s interior design—the furniture the finishes, the lighting—made Jeff’s design pop,” he says. “We entertain customers there for all the brands, and they are blown away. That’s what you need to do in this business. A sense of place enhances the value and image of the wines you make.”

who
Project: Trinchero Napa Valley. Owner: Trinchero Family Estates. Architect: BAR Architects; Jeff Goodwin, AIA, LEED AP, principal; Shaowen Chou, LEED AP, associate; John Imhoff, project manager; Marcus Mueller, project architect. Interior designer: Erin Martin Design; Erin Martin, principal; Maria Franchi; Robin Denver. Contractor: Facility Development Corporation. Lighting consultant: MLS Arch-Light Design. Engineers: Summit Engineering, Inc. (civil); KPFF Consulting Engineers (structural); TEP Engineering, Electrical Ray E. Slaughter & Associates (mechanical+HVAC). Kitchen: Castino Restaurant Supply. Landscape: Jonathan Plant & Associates, Inc. Winery Systems: MAC Powell. Photographer: Doug Dun, BAR Architects; Douglas Sterling, Douglas Sterling Photography.

what
Brick: Endicott Brick, Manganese Iron spot. Pendant chandeliers, dining table, exterior lanterns: Custom design by Erin Martin, available through Martin Showroom. Dining Chairs: Orkney Chairs from Mimi London Cellar. Casework: Lewis & Williams. Corner chair: Orkney Chair from Mimi London. Walls, ceiling, fireplace: Expert Plastering Inc. Wood ceiling beams: Hand finished by Antique works. Wood floors: First, Last, & Always. Area rug: Woven Accents Lanterns from Antiques on Old Plank Road. Sandblasted glass: Glass Interiors. Rustic table: Blackman Cruz. Large resin pendant lights from Spain: available through Martin Showroom. Massive steel hood: Ferrous Inc. Limestone tile: Haussmann Natural Stone. Backsplash island countertop: Calacatta Marble Island & wall treatment: Nantucket Bead board “V” groove. Kitchen wall tile: Dale Tile. Stools: Matis Stool from Blackman Cruz. 19th century counter: Donna Parker Habitat. Outdoor chairs: Sutherland. Chai fabric Outdoor Coffee Tables: Stacked Redwood Benches designed by Erin Martin, available through Martin Showroom. Bench Cushion: Perennials Fabric. Metal Benches: Ray’s Custom Ironworks. Lounge chairs: Ralph Pucci, Jens Risom. Sofa: Axel Vervoordt Elliot Sofa.Wood Coffee Table: Martin Showroom. Conference chairs: Holly Hunt Leather. Custom conference table: Mick Handley. Area rug: Merida Meridian. Walls, ceiling: Expert Plastering Inc. Antique iron chandelier: rewired from Martin Showroom. Regency picture lights: Urban Archeology. Rope chandelier: Martin Showroom. Steel fireplace: Ferrous Inc. Upholstery: Back to Basics.Reading lights: Holly Hunt. Statue: “The Brothers” by Simon Toparovsky. Easel floor lamp: J.F. Chen. Studded Floor Lamp from Martin Showroom. Mid-century chair: Hampton Antique Galleries II.

where
Location: St. Helena, CA. Total floor area: 24,000 sq. ft. (winery production building); 10,800 sq. ft. (hospitality center). No. of floors: 1 + mezzanine (winery); 2 (hospitality center). Average floor size: 19,750 sq. ft. (winery production level); 7,450 sq. ft. (hospitality main level). Cost/sq. ft.: $450 (winery); $500 (hospitality center).
 


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