Contract - Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

design - features - healthcare design



Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

15 October, 2013

-By Michael Webb. Photography by 
John Linden


Over the past century, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center has expanded from a two-story house to a 29-acre campus at the eastern edge of Beverly Hills. Its latest addition, the 820,000-square-foot Advanced Health Science Pavilion (AHSP), occupies the last vacant site on the campus and was designed as a sleek new gateway. Like Kaleida Heath Gates Vascular Institute and UB Clinical Translational Research Center 
in Buffalo, also designed by HOK (Contract, October 2012), it is a synthesis of laboratories, seminar rooms, and clinical facilities. The AHSP is designed to enhance the outpatient experience and to attract doctors who practice, teach, and do research.

The AHSP appears to be precisely tailored to neurosciences and cardiology, but the final configuration was long delayed. At the outset 
of the planning process in 2006, Ernest Cirangle headed a team from the Los Angeles office of HOK that collaborated with nine potential 
tenant groups to determine their needs. The result was a module of 60-square-foot units, which could be expanded and customized to serve as staff workstations and exam, treatment, and procedure rooms. “The program was very fluid,” recalls Robert Cull, an experienced healthcare architect who was brought in as executive project manager for Cedars-Sinai. “HOK gave us a platform that allowed us to evolve, and infrastructure that we can adapt in the near term and over the life of the building. To foster interaction, gathering areas are scattered through the new building.”

Rich materials in soft shades soothe patients

A limestone base serves as a plinth for double-glazed curtain walls that pull natural light into the eight upper floors. Patients take an elevator from the six-level parking garage to a double-height, second-floor atrium that serves as a central hub. Surgery prep and testing areas are consolidated behind the reception desk, and a cafe leads onto a terrace at the opposite end of the room. A donor wall made of Jerusalem stone showcases Jewish philanthropy. The floors are mostly polished Jura limestone and carpet in the waiting areas and corridors muffles noise.

Eucalyptus-veneered wood adds warmth to the slatted screen that surrounds three sides of the mezzanine, and various types of seating make it a welcome gathering place for patients and staff alike.
Soft, neutral tones impart a sense of serenity. “Color, texture, 
and varied lighting gives patients and staff a feeling of comfort, and thoughtful organization makes the building easy to navigate,” explains Pam Light, HOK senior vice president. Artwork placed throughout 
the building draws from a professionally-curated collection that Cedars-Sinai has acquired as donations over several decades.  

“Everyone is trying to make hospitals as appealing as hotels 
or spas,” says Clay Pendergrast, HOK interior designer. “One way of avoiding sterility is to have as little healthcare furniture as possible. 
The client wanted furnishings that were impressive, comfortable, and would stand the test of time, while being hygienic and easy to maintain.” 
A generous budget and the diversity of the program allowed him to specify high-end Danish designs, including Carl Hansen & Son’s 
leather wing chairs and compact bench seating.

Floor identities tend towards the zen
Each floor has a distinct identity. Skeletal leaves are laminated into translucent acrylic screens that divide the cardiology waiting room 
into a series of intimate niches. On the neurosciences floor, seating is arranged in an arc around the reception desk, and circular ripples in the ceiling evoke the raked gravel in a zen garden. Neuroscientist Dr. Keith Black wanted a large tank of jellyfish to soothe his patients, and when that proved infeasible (changing the water and fish would have presented hygiene issues), he settled for high-definition plasma screens that play videos of jellyfish from the Monterey Bay Aquarium. An expansive boardroom commands views of the Hollywood Hills. Even the fifth-floor outpatient surgery area has a cool-yet-welcoming feel.

The culmination of this effort to raise spirits through design is achieved in the blue atrium that links the eighth and ninth floors. Layered panels, finished in Venetian plaster, turn the end walls into relief sculptures, and Louis Poulsen’s cone chandeliers hang in the void. An open staircase links the labs and seminar rooms on the two levels, and some of the brightest minds in medicine exchange ideas and data in the central seating area.

Cedars-Sinai was willing to invest in quality and longevity, but it was a challenge for the designers to balance all the conflicting priorities. Pendergrast says, “Individuals were very specific about the design of their offices, but we were all able to agree on a palette of colors and materials that achieves a sense of harmony in the shared spaces.”

Key Design Highlights

  • A two-story lobby, finished in 
Jerusalam limestone and wood paneling, serves as the central hub for the building.
  • Floors have distinct identities, 
but the building is unified by 
its subtle color scheme and 
the well-crafted materials 
used throughout.
  • Laboratories were designed 
to attract top doctors and researchers to the facility.
  • Calming spaces for patients 
contain artwork and modern Danish furnishings to avoid a traditional healthcare aesthetic.  


Cedars-Sinai Medical 
Center Advanced Health Services Pavilion

  • Architect: HOK
  • Client: Cedars-Sinai
  • Where: Los Angeles
  • What: 820,000 total square feet 
on eleven floors and parking
  • Cost/sf: Withheld at client’s request




Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

15 October, 2013


Over the past century, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center has expanded from a two-story house to a 29-acre campus at the eastern edge of Beverly Hills. Its latest addition, the 820,000-square-foot Advanced Health Science Pavilion (AHSP), occupies the last vacant site on the campus and was designed as a sleek new gateway. Like Kaleida Heath Gates Vascular Institute and UB Clinical Translational Research Center 
in Buffalo, also designed by HOK (Contract, October 2012), it is a synthesis of laboratories, seminar rooms, and clinical facilities. The AHSP is designed to enhance the outpatient experience and to attract doctors who practice, teach, and do research.

The AHSP appears to be precisely tailored to neurosciences and cardiology, but the final configuration was long delayed. At the outset 
of the planning process in 2006, Ernest Cirangle headed a team from the Los Angeles office of HOK that collaborated with nine potential 
tenant groups to determine their needs. The result was a module of 60-square-foot units, which could be expanded and customized to serve as staff workstations and exam, treatment, and procedure rooms. “The program was very fluid,” recalls Robert Cull, an experienced healthcare architect who was brought in as executive project manager for Cedars-Sinai. “HOK gave us a platform that allowed us to evolve, and infrastructure that we can adapt in the near term and over the life of the building. To foster interaction, gathering areas are scattered through the new building.”

Rich materials in soft shades soothe patients

A limestone base serves as a plinth for double-glazed curtain walls that pull natural light into the eight upper floors. Patients take an elevator from the six-level parking garage to a double-height, second-floor atrium that serves as a central hub. Surgery prep and testing areas are consolidated behind the reception desk, and a cafe leads onto a terrace at the opposite end of the room. A donor wall made of Jerusalem stone showcases Jewish philanthropy. The floors are mostly polished Jura limestone and carpet in the waiting areas and corridors muffles noise.

Eucalyptus-veneered wood adds warmth to the slatted screen that surrounds three sides of the mezzanine, and various types of seating make it a welcome gathering place for patients and staff alike.
Soft, neutral tones impart a sense of serenity. “Color, texture, 
and varied lighting gives patients and staff a feeling of comfort, and thoughtful organization makes the building easy to navigate,” explains Pam Light, HOK senior vice president. Artwork placed throughout 
the building draws from a professionally-curated collection that Cedars-Sinai has acquired as donations over several decades.  

“Everyone is trying to make hospitals as appealing as hotels 
or spas,” says Clay Pendergrast, HOK interior designer. “One way of avoiding sterility is to have as little healthcare furniture as possible. 
The client wanted furnishings that were impressive, comfortable, and would stand the test of time, while being hygienic and easy to maintain.” 
A generous budget and the diversity of the program allowed him to specify high-end Danish designs, including Carl Hansen & Son’s 
leather wing chairs and compact bench seating.

Floor identities tend towards the zen
Each floor has a distinct identity. Skeletal leaves are laminated into translucent acrylic screens that divide the cardiology waiting room 
into a series of intimate niches. On the neurosciences floor, seating is arranged in an arc around the reception desk, and circular ripples in the ceiling evoke the raked gravel in a zen garden. Neuroscientist Dr. Keith Black wanted a large tank of jellyfish to soothe his patients, and when that proved infeasible (changing the water and fish would have presented hygiene issues), he settled for high-definition plasma screens that play videos of jellyfish from the Monterey Bay Aquarium. An expansive boardroom commands views of the Hollywood Hills. Even the fifth-floor outpatient surgery area has a cool-yet-welcoming feel.

The culmination of this effort to raise spirits through design is achieved in the blue atrium that links the eighth and ninth floors. Layered panels, finished in Venetian plaster, turn the end walls into relief sculptures, and Louis Poulsen’s cone chandeliers hang in the void. An open staircase links the labs and seminar rooms on the two levels, and some of the brightest minds in medicine exchange ideas and data in the central seating area.

Cedars-Sinai was willing to invest in quality and longevity, but it was a challenge for the designers to balance all the conflicting priorities. Pendergrast says, “Individuals were very specific about the design of their offices, but we were all able to agree on a palette of colors and materials that achieves a sense of harmony in the shared spaces.”

Key Design Highlights

  • A two-story lobby, finished in 
Jerusalam limestone and wood paneling, serves as the central hub for the building.
  • Floors have distinct identities, 
but the building is unified by 
its subtle color scheme and 
the well-crafted materials 
used throughout.
  • Laboratories were designed 
to attract top doctors and researchers to the facility.
  • Calming spaces for patients 
contain artwork and modern Danish furnishings to avoid a traditional healthcare aesthetic.  


Cedars-Sinai Medical 
Center Advanced Health Services Pavilion

  • Architect: HOK
  • Client: Cedars-Sinai
  • Where: Los Angeles
  • What: 820,000 total square feet 
on eleven floors and parking
  • Cost/sf: Withheld at client’s request

 


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