Contract - Corporate Designs for Face-to-Face Value

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Corporate Designs for Face-to-Face Value

12 October, 2009

-By AnnMarie Marano , Photography by Eric Laignel



Clive Meanwell doesn't like the word "headquarters." Meanwell, CEO of The Medicines Company in Parsippany, N.J., didn't want the international biotechnology and pharmaceutical company's new home to be considered just its main base of operations, but rather more like a hub of energy and ideas. Drawing from his British roots, he and the steering committee for the new building wanted designers to use Piccadilly Square as an inspiration.

"They were really looking for an independent location that would have more of an identity within the community," says Kimberly Sacramone, IIDA, LEED AP, principal at HLW International in New York. The group was growing out of its old space and was housed on two different floors that were not connected. So after HLW proved itself with a new structure and an additional wing, the firm was recruited to complete the interiors, as well.

To accommodate the tremendously long hours the Medicines Company staff works, HLW developed a design solution that blurred the line between home and office while still promoting efficiency and dedication. The original space housed a much larger number of open workstations when compared to private offices. The designers inverted that percentage of open versus private. "We took a different tactic when we built out the space," says William O'Connor, vice president and chief accounting officer for The Medicines Company, who also served on the steering committee for the design of the new headquarters. "Most are looking for an open plan with a lot of cubicles and workspaces. We are closer to 75 percent offices."

The private offices are small at 10 ft. by 12 ft., have glass fronts to ensure proper lighting, and are acoustically sealed. While there's a set kit of six to seven pieces of furniture (which can be configured in a variety of ways by the user) within the office, there is only one guest chair to ensure that people don't engage in longer meetings. "It makes people get out of their offices and go to the living rooms and lounges we've designed," for those spontaneous meetings, Sacramone explains.

"Clive and the steering committee wanted it to be utilitarian feeling with clean lines. They didn't want it to be fussy," Sacramone says. "It was more about creating a stage for their ingenuity, and they wanted the planning to really support and foster collaboration with these chance moments."

The floor plan forces circulation to move through certain social hubs, such as the "living rooms." Each has its own personality, some with a familial style, while others are more formal. A tremendous number of conference rooms also serve as a way to draw people out of their neighborhoods.

"One of the things we looked to HLW to do was help us with usable meeting space," O'Connor says. "We have a variety of conference rooms, several with audio visual equipment, which we utilize a lot because we are such a global company." On the first floor there are three training rooms, two of which have retractable walls that accordion into the ceiling at the flip of a switch. This creates a space that can house approximately 400 people, which O'Connor says the company has used to hold town hall meetings. The space can hold the entire Parsippany employee population, and workers from The Medicines Company's international offices can be conferenced in. It also serves as an event space, as the cafeteria is directly off these training rooms.

The steering committee also wanted the company to finally be able to feel comfortable bringing their customers into their home. The two-story atrium reception area achieves that welcoming feel with a back-painted glass wall that houses a large inset audiovisual feature. The LCD panels support the Medicines Company brand and can showcase a variety of elements. The design was also driven by sustainability, with all locally sourced materials, from the terrazzo flooring in the reception area to the recycled cork rubber flooring that runs the main hallway. A graphics package created by HLW incorporates The Medicines Company brand within the architecture. It brings nature indoors with close-ups, such as the water droplets outside of the fitness center.

"Quality of life was very important," Sacramone says of her client. And because HLW understood that The Medicines Company wasn't looking for the traditional headquarters, the firm created physical space that made all the difference to a proficient workflow.


who
Project, client: The Medicines Company. Architect, interior designer, structural engineer, lighting designer: HLW International. Mechanical/electrical engineer: Van Praet and Weisgerber. General contractor: Structuretone. Project Manager: The Walsh Company. Furniture dealer: CFI. Photographer: Eric Laignel.

what
Wallcoverings: MDC, Xorel, Knoll. Paint: Benjamin Moore. Laminate: Formica. Flooring: Expanko, Terrazzo by Krisstone. Carpet/carpet tile: C&A Tandus, Shaw Contract, Interface. Ceiling: Armstrong, Hunter Douglas. Lighting: Mark Lighting, Axis Lighting, Lightolier, Lukas Custom Lighting, Lithonia, Tech Lighting. Doors, glass, window frames/wall systems: Clestra Hauserman. Window treatments: MechoShade. Workstations/seating: Haworth. Lounge seating:Nienkamper, Coallesse, Bernhardt,Bright, OFS, B&B Itallia, Harter. Cafeteria, dining, auditorium seating:Vecta,Sandler Seating, Allermuir, Brayton, Davis. Other seating: Keilhauer. Upholstery: Knoll, Designtex, Luna, Carnegie, Maharam, Bernhardt, Unika Vaev, Pollack, Brayton. Conference table: Haworth, Halcon. Cafeteria, dining, training tables: Bernhardt. Other tables:Haworth/Castelli, Martin Brattrud, Suite NY, Bright, Bernhardt, Ekitta, Brueton.

where
Location: Parsippany, NJ. Total floor area: 112,000 sq. ft. No. of floors: 3. Average floor size: 55,000 sq. ft. Total staff size: 240.



Corporate Designs for Face-to-Face Value

12 October, 2009


Eric Laignel

Clive Meanwell doesn't like the word "headquarters." Meanwell, CEO of The Medicines Company in Parsippany, N.J., didn't want the international biotechnology and pharmaceutical company's new home to be considered just its main base of operations, but rather more like a hub of energy and ideas. Drawing from his British roots, he and the steering committee for the new building wanted designers to use Piccadilly Square as an inspiration.

"They were really looking for an independent location that would have more of an identity within the community," says Kimberly Sacramone, IIDA, LEED AP, principal at HLW International in New York. The group was growing out of its old space and was housed on two different floors that were not connected. So after HLW proved itself with a new structure and an additional wing, the firm was recruited to complete the interiors, as well.

To accommodate the tremendously long hours the Medicines Company staff works, HLW developed a design solution that blurred the line between home and office while still promoting efficiency and dedication. The original space housed a much larger number of open workstations when compared to private offices. The designers inverted that percentage of open versus private. "We took a different tactic when we built out the space," says William O'Connor, vice president and chief accounting officer for The Medicines Company, who also served on the steering committee for the design of the new headquarters. "Most are looking for an open plan with a lot of cubicles and workspaces. We are closer to 75 percent offices."

The private offices are small at 10 ft. by 12 ft., have glass fronts to ensure proper lighting, and are acoustically sealed. While there's a set kit of six to seven pieces of furniture (which can be configured in a variety of ways by the user) within the office, there is only one guest chair to ensure that people don't engage in longer meetings. "It makes people get out of their offices and go to the living rooms and lounges we've designed," for those spontaneous meetings, Sacramone explains.

"Clive and the steering committee wanted it to be utilitarian feeling with clean lines. They didn't want it to be fussy," Sacramone says. "It was more about creating a stage for their ingenuity, and they wanted the planning to really support and foster collaboration with these chance moments."

The floor plan forces circulation to move through certain social hubs, such as the "living rooms." Each has its own personality, some with a familial style, while others are more formal. A tremendous number of conference rooms also serve as a way to draw people out of their neighborhoods.

"One of the things we looked to HLW to do was help us with usable meeting space," O'Connor says. "We have a variety of conference rooms, several with audio visual equipment, which we utilize a lot because we are such a global company." On the first floor there are three training rooms, two of which have retractable walls that accordion into the ceiling at the flip of a switch. This creates a space that can house approximately 400 people, which O'Connor says the company has used to hold town hall meetings. The space can hold the entire Parsippany employee population, and workers from The Medicines Company's international offices can be conferenced in. It also serves as an event space, as the cafeteria is directly off these training rooms.

The steering committee also wanted the company to finally be able to feel comfortable bringing their customers into their home. The two-story atrium reception area achieves that welcoming feel with a back-painted glass wall that houses a large inset audiovisual feature. The LCD panels support the Medicines Company brand and can showcase a variety of elements. The design was also driven by sustainability, with all locally sourced materials, from the terrazzo flooring in the reception area to the recycled cork rubber flooring that runs the main hallway. A graphics package created by HLW incorporates The Medicines Company brand within the architecture. It brings nature indoors with close-ups, such as the water droplets outside of the fitness center.

"Quality of life was very important," Sacramone says of her client. And because HLW understood that The Medicines Company wasn't looking for the traditional headquarters, the firm created physical space that made all the difference to a proficient workflow.


who
Project, client: The Medicines Company. Architect, interior designer, structural engineer, lighting designer: HLW International. Mechanical/electrical engineer: Van Praet and Weisgerber. General contractor: Structuretone. Project Manager: The Walsh Company. Furniture dealer: CFI. Photographer: Eric Laignel.

what
Wallcoverings: MDC, Xorel, Knoll. Paint: Benjamin Moore. Laminate: Formica. Flooring: Expanko, Terrazzo by Krisstone. Carpet/carpet tile: C&A Tandus, Shaw Contract, Interface. Ceiling: Armstrong, Hunter Douglas. Lighting: Mark Lighting, Axis Lighting, Lightolier, Lukas Custom Lighting, Lithonia, Tech Lighting. Doors, glass, window frames/wall systems: Clestra Hauserman. Window treatments: MechoShade. Workstations/seating: Haworth. Lounge seating:Nienkamper, Coallesse, Bernhardt,Bright, OFS, B&B Itallia, Harter. Cafeteria, dining, auditorium seating:Vecta,Sandler Seating, Allermuir, Brayton, Davis. Other seating: Keilhauer. Upholstery: Knoll, Designtex, Luna, Carnegie, Maharam, Bernhardt, Unika Vaev, Pollack, Brayton. Conference table: Haworth, Halcon. Cafeteria, dining, training tables: Bernhardt. Other tables:Haworth/Castelli, Martin Brattrud, Suite NY, Bright, Bernhardt, Ekitta, Brueton.

where
Location: Parsippany, NJ. Total floor area: 112,000 sq. ft. No. of floors: 3. Average floor size: 55,000 sq. ft. Total staff size: 240.
 


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