Contract - Designing for Health: Outpatient Trends and Hospitable Destinations of Choice in Urban Centers

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Designing for Health: Outpatient Trends and Hospitable Destinations of Choice in Urban Centers

01 April, 2014

-By Ted Shaw, Carolyn BaRoss


The trend is for healthcare systems to bring healthcare portals closer to the patient’s workplace, in more appealing and accessible facilities. These signature spaces help spread the institution’s identity throughout the community, blend a multitude of specialties for enhanced and collaborative care, and importantly, heightened convenience for the patient. Design plays an important role in creating the overall impression of these space, and serves as a vehicle to enhance one’s impression of the particular client.  Aesthetics and spatial solutions are progressing away from those that have been easily identifiable as “healthcare,” and increasingly recalling other sectors. This is in step with the overarching trend of the new hybrid environments: residential-workplace, wellness-workplace, and now hospitality-healthcare.

These centers often are in commercial buildings to enhance patient access through geographic proximity, with welcoming facilities and programmatic diversity that supports clinical workflow, collaboration and communication, in a one-stop patient destination. Limitations in floor-to-floor heights, and accommodation of engineering requirements and diagnostic and treatment equipment can be a challenge in commercial office buildings, but can be overcome. When healthcare institutions and design team up in support of strategic business goals, the end product can realize greater aspirations, and create destinations of choice. Good design is good business.

Multi-specialty practices are also the trend. Beyond convenience for the patient, a benefit to clinicians is to be in proximity to their complementary peers. This is the case for many types of workplaces. Extensive research, such as a recent study from the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research, demonstrates that that there are obvious advantages to bringing distinct but mutually relevant departments into physical proximity. Benefits include increased formation of new collaborations, which increase and improve the quality of information sharing, in turn improving the odds that everyone is up to date on the latest developments in each other’s departments. In addition, collocation of multiple specialties significantly increases opportunities for all members of a care team to share information about a patient, with the objective of more seamless care.

At New York University Langone Medical Center (NYU LMC) in New York City, the new Center for Musculoskeletal Care is an intentionally integrated facility, including both clinical care and biomedical research resources for bone and joint patients. The comprehensive program includes treatment spaces for sports medicine, spine, arthritis, autoimmune disease, sports injuries, and total joint replacement along with radiology, infusion therapy, rehabilitation and pain management. In addition, the Seligman Center for Advanced Therapeutics is incorporated within the Center, along with an infusion suite, which collectively support ongoing clinical trials of new therapies. Doctors are able to have daily engagement with their patients’ rehabilitation via proximity. An interconnecting stair with city views and a design that invites use, connects to the rehabilitation practice. It’s everything a musculoskeletal patient would want, including a rehab gym with river views, which appears more executive health club than clinic.

In the compact but highly diversified Preston Robert Tisch Center for Men’s Health, collocation to uniquely serve men and their concerns is the target. With an ambiance that recalls hospitality, an airline’s business class lounge or sophisticated office, this recent addition to NYU Langone Medical Center caters to the contemporary urban male, offering a vast range of medical services that focus specifically on men’s health: cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, neurology, orthopedics, urology, and more. Specialists from these various areas are able to serve patients and also communicate daily with each other. As a patient, one’s entire array of doctors are not only on the same page, they are in the same inviting place.

A final and increasingly emphasized aspect of patient outreach is branding. This includes everything from attention-grabbing messaging by the NYU LMC client, like full-page advertisements stating “Men Have Needs, Too,” to ensure that a health system’s portfolio facilities have a cohesive identity despite each having a distinct look and feel. For example, in the case of the Center for Musculoskeletal Care, the exposed structure and main staircase have a distinctive and subtly skeletal form, while the Center for Men’s Health features a range of handsome and highly textural finishes that recall bespoke menswear. The final effect is that the patient has a clear sense of place at each facility, but also understands the high quality of the experience that he or she will have at any center within the NYU Langone system. The patient-centered, concierge-like sensibility is always tangible.

Considering how “insulated [the healthcare industry has historically been] from consumerism” when compared to other highly competitive industries, such as hospitality, effective branding may become the key to success for today’s healthcare systems. And while hospitals are currently “hiring consultants from Disney and Ritz-Carlton to teach them how to improve patient experience,” perhaps other industries will soon be looking to healthcare for lessons on gaining market share in style.


Biography

Ted Shaw, Sr. Associate, Perkins+Will is the senior designer and project architect for both NYU LMC projects. He can be reached at Ted.Shaw@perkinswill.com

Carolyn BaRoss, Principal, Perkins+Will, was the Design Principal for both NYU LMC projects and can be reached at Carolyn.baross@perkinswill.com

Citations

1.    Berry, Leonard L. and Dunham, Jamie, “Redefining the Patient Experience with Collaborative Car.” HBR Blog Network. 20 September 2013. http://blogs.hbr.org/2013/09/redefining-the-patient-experience-with-collaborative-care/

2.    Owen-Smith, Jason; Kabo, Felichism; Levenstein, Margaret; Price, Richard; & Davis, Gerald. A Tale of Two Buildings: Socio-Spatial Significance in Innovation. University of Michigan Institute for Social Research. 25 October 2012.  http://home.isr.umich.edu/releases/sharing-space-proximity-breeds-collaboration

3.    NYU Langone Medical Center website for Preston Robert Tisch Center for Men’s Health. http://www.med.nyu.edu/menshealth#panel-2


4.    Keckley, Paul H., “Branding in the health care industry: a whole new ball game.” A View from the Center. Deloitte Center for Health Solutions. 26 November 2012. http://blogs.deloitte.com/centerforhealthsolutions/2012/11/branding-in-the-health-care-industry-a-whole-new-ball-game.html#.UyyeuuIQdmg

5.    Riggle, Jenn, “Patient-centered care must-haves: Convenience, flexibility.” Hospital Impact. 9 January 2013. http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/01/09/patient_centered_care_must_haves_conveni




Designing for Health: Outpatient Trends and Hospitable Destinations of Choice in Urban Centers

01 April, 2014


The trend is for healthcare systems to bring healthcare portals closer to the patient’s workplace, in more appealing and accessible facilities. These signature spaces help spread the institution’s identity throughout the community, blend a multitude of specialties for enhanced and collaborative care, and importantly, heightened convenience for the patient. Design plays an important role in creating the overall impression of these space, and serves as a vehicle to enhance one’s impression of the particular client.  Aesthetics and spatial solutions are progressing away from those that have been easily identifiable as “healthcare,” and increasingly recalling other sectors. This is in step with the overarching trend of the new hybrid environments: residential-workplace, wellness-workplace, and now hospitality-healthcare.

These centers often are in commercial buildings to enhance patient access through geographic proximity, with welcoming facilities and programmatic diversity that supports clinical workflow, collaboration and communication, in a one-stop patient destination. Limitations in floor-to-floor heights, and accommodation of engineering requirements and diagnostic and treatment equipment can be a challenge in commercial office buildings, but can be overcome. When healthcare institutions and design team up in support of strategic business goals, the end product can realize greater aspirations, and create destinations of choice. Good design is good business.

Multi-specialty practices are also the trend. Beyond convenience for the patient, a benefit to clinicians is to be in proximity to their complementary peers. This is the case for many types of workplaces. Extensive research, such as a recent study from the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research, demonstrates that that there are obvious advantages to bringing distinct but mutually relevant departments into physical proximity. Benefits include increased formation of new collaborations, which increase and improve the quality of information sharing, in turn improving the odds that everyone is up to date on the latest developments in each other’s departments. In addition, collocation of multiple specialties significantly increases opportunities for all members of a care team to share information about a patient, with the objective of more seamless care.

At New York University Langone Medical Center (NYU LMC) in New York City, the new Center for Musculoskeletal Care is an intentionally integrated facility, including both clinical care and biomedical research resources for bone and joint patients. The comprehensive program includes treatment spaces for sports medicine, spine, arthritis, autoimmune disease, sports injuries, and total joint replacement along with radiology, infusion therapy, rehabilitation and pain management. In addition, the Seligman Center for Advanced Therapeutics is incorporated within the Center, along with an infusion suite, which collectively support ongoing clinical trials of new therapies. Doctors are able to have daily engagement with their patients’ rehabilitation via proximity. An interconnecting stair with city views and a design that invites use, connects to the rehabilitation practice. It’s everything a musculoskeletal patient would want, including a rehab gym with river views, which appears more executive health club than clinic.

In the compact but highly diversified Preston Robert Tisch Center for Men’s Health, collocation to uniquely serve men and their concerns is the target. With an ambiance that recalls hospitality, an airline’s business class lounge or sophisticated office, this recent addition to NYU Langone Medical Center caters to the contemporary urban male, offering a vast range of medical services that focus specifically on men’s health: cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, neurology, orthopedics, urology, and more. Specialists from these various areas are able to serve patients and also communicate daily with each other. As a patient, one’s entire array of doctors are not only on the same page, they are in the same inviting place.

A final and increasingly emphasized aspect of patient outreach is branding. This includes everything from attention-grabbing messaging by the NYU LMC client, like full-page advertisements stating “Men Have Needs, Too,” to ensure that a health system’s portfolio facilities have a cohesive identity despite each having a distinct look and feel. For example, in the case of the Center for Musculoskeletal Care, the exposed structure and main staircase have a distinctive and subtly skeletal form, while the Center for Men’s Health features a range of handsome and highly textural finishes that recall bespoke menswear. The final effect is that the patient has a clear sense of place at each facility, but also understands the high quality of the experience that he or she will have at any center within the NYU Langone system. The patient-centered, concierge-like sensibility is always tangible.

Considering how “insulated [the healthcare industry has historically been] from consumerism” when compared to other highly competitive industries, such as hospitality, effective branding may become the key to success for today’s healthcare systems. And while hospitals are currently “hiring consultants from Disney and Ritz-Carlton to teach them how to improve patient experience,” perhaps other industries will soon be looking to healthcare for lessons on gaining market share in style.


Biography

Ted Shaw, Sr. Associate, Perkins+Will is the senior designer and project architect for both NYU LMC projects. He can be reached at Ted.Shaw@perkinswill.com

Carolyn BaRoss, Principal, Perkins+Will, was the Design Principal for both NYU LMC projects and can be reached at Carolyn.baross@perkinswill.com

Citations

1.    Berry, Leonard L. and Dunham, Jamie, “Redefining the Patient Experience with Collaborative Car.” HBR Blog Network. 20 September 2013. http://blogs.hbr.org/2013/09/redefining-the-patient-experience-with-collaborative-care/

2.    Owen-Smith, Jason; Kabo, Felichism; Levenstein, Margaret; Price, Richard; & Davis, Gerald. A Tale of Two Buildings: Socio-Spatial Significance in Innovation. University of Michigan Institute for Social Research. 25 October 2012.  http://home.isr.umich.edu/releases/sharing-space-proximity-breeds-collaboration

3.    NYU Langone Medical Center website for Preston Robert Tisch Center for Men’s Health. http://www.med.nyu.edu/menshealth#panel-2


4.    Keckley, Paul H., “Branding in the health care industry: a whole new ball game.” A View from the Center. Deloitte Center for Health Solutions. 26 November 2012. http://blogs.deloitte.com/centerforhealthsolutions/2012/11/branding-in-the-health-care-industry-a-whole-new-ball-game.html#.UyyeuuIQdmg

5.    Riggle, Jenn, “Patient-centered care must-haves: Convenience, flexibility.” Hospital Impact. 9 January 2013. http://www.hospitalimpact.org/index.php/2013/01/09/patient_centered_care_must_haves_conveni

 


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