Contract - Hot Shops: Fontainebleau Hotel's Three Redesigned Shops by H DeVinn Visual and Mancini Duffy

design - features - retail design



Hot Shops: Fontainebleau Hotel's Three Redesigned Shops by H DeVinn Visual and Mancini Duffy

09 August, 2010

-By Amy Milshtein


Morris Lapidus famously said: “If you create a stage and it is grand, everyone who enters will play their part.” No one can deny that his most famous stage, the Fontainebleau Hotel in Miami Beach, is appropriately grand. Defiled by critics of the day as overly garish and flamboyant, the New York Times called it “inspired superschlock.” Yet it was embraced by the jet-setting public of the ’50s and ’60s, and its sexy, sweeping lines served as backdrop for such movies as “Goldfinger” and “Scarface.”

But like many icons of the day, the Fontainebleau, with its 17,000-sq.-ft. lobby and legendary “Staircase to Nowhere,” fell into disfavor. No longer playing host to celebrities like Elvis Presley and Judy Garland, the hotel quietly sat until the area’s resurgence in the ’80s and ’90s. In 2008 the Fontainebleau received a $1-billion expansion and face-lift, including three retail shops by H DeVinn Visual and Mancini • Duffy that recapture the Lapidus magic and reinterpret it for today.

Aquamarine is the lower level swim shop, set under one of the restaurant kitchens. The designers had to contend with mechanicals, grease traps, and pipes set above a low, accessible ceiling. “That space kept changing and shrinking,” recalls John Rawlins, director of interior design, H DeVinn Visual. Despite the limitations, Aquamarine still impresses with its Dorothy Draper-esque sensibility and features Thai silk curtains, mirrored panels, and a vintage Venini “starburst” chandelier. A Rococo mirror creates a focal point, while a white rubber Baroque armchair provides a restful spot for shoppers. The front door is pure glamour, reminiscent of a 1950s movie star dressing room entrance.

Ida and Harry is a shop that offers an eclectic array of exclusive designer clothing, shoes, and accessory brands. Named after one of the owner’s grandparents, the store’s undulating floor plan recalls the sweeping form of the hotel itself. “The wall of circular vitrines was inspired directly from Lapidus’ original design,” says DeVinn Bruce, creative director, H DeVinn Visual. “They are strong totems that we wanted to capture.” The hand-knotted carpets are reinterpretations of the original, while a set of lounge chairs and curvaceous benches are actually original Lapidus designs. Mirrored, mosaic-tile walls lend a lizard-skin effect. “It’s a graphic, bold space that pays homage to the 1950s but still is fresh and modern,” says Rawlins. Indeed, materials like LED lighting and translucent resins ground the space firmly in the present.

Sundries can be found at Morris & Co., a 495-sq.-ft. jewel box that features all of the notions, lotions, bits, and bobs one would expect in a hotel convenience store—but the similarities stop there. The high-end offerings and gifts are displayed like gems on polished chrome and white lacquer shelves. Even the usual sundry items receive special treatment with each tucked into one of 72 drawers of a custom apothecary table. “Usually that kind of merchandise is displayed on a pegboard, and it ends up a mess,” says Edward M. Calabrese, creative director, retail group, Mancini • Duffy. Silver mica chip wallcoverings, clusters of mercury glass, and cobalt-blue poured-terrazzo flooring surrounded by white marble that spills out into the lobby complete the space.

All of the shops walk that fine line between inspiration and imitation, a feature that Fontainebleau director of retail operations Brooke Soffer demanded from the beginning. “The retail needed to be in line with everything else in the space,” she recalls. “The three had to be cohesive but with each one still being able to stand on its own.” The stores are doing a great job of standing on their own, as each venue is in the black during this difficult economy, and there are plans to expand. “They are more than just a convenience to our 1,500 guests,” Soffer continues. “The shops have unique items that pull locals in as well as delighting savvy travelers.”

“They definitely look special; not like the management leased out a corner of the space to some random retailer,” says Calabrese. “Everyone’s eyes were on this project from the start, and I think it has surpassed expectations.”

It even fulfilled some wishes. “Lapidus is a personal hero of mine,” admits Rawlins. “He started in retail interiors like me, and when I was in college I stayed at the Fontainebleau. I like to think he would be happy with what we’ve done.”

who
Project: Shops at Fontainebleau Project team: H Devinn Visual, John Rawlins and Devinn Bruce, creative designers; Mancini Duffy Architecture Design Retail Group, Christine Wild, Project Manager, Aya Mizuguchi, technical support; Fontainebleau Resorts, Brooke Soffer, VP, retail, Kashia Orlando, director of retail. Lighting Designer: Lighting Workshop. Architect of record: BC Architects. General contractor: Brodson Construction. Millworkers: Horizon Millwork. Photography: Eric Laignel.

what
For Aquamarine—Wall merchandise system: Marlite. Decorative acrylic: Lightblocks. Decorative fabrics: Carnegie, Majilite, Clarence House. Paint: Benjamin Moore. Plastic Laminate: Formica, Wilsonart. Solid Surfacing: Corian. Decorative Wall surfacing: Maya Romanoff, Studio E. Wallcoverings: Carnegie. Furniture: Studio JSPR Netherlands, Oly Studio. Decorative Door Hardware: Nanz Hardware.
For Ida & Harry—Mosaic tiles: Sicis. Wall merchandise system: Marlite. Decorative Acrylic: LightBlocks, McKee Surfaces. Decorative hardware: Jamestown Furniture Hardware. Paint: Benjamin Moore. Plastic Laminate: Formica, Wilsonart. Solid surface: Corian. Wallcoverings: Graham & Brown, Maya Romanoff, Art People, Xorel, KnollTextiles. Wood Veneer: Tabu thru Veneer Specialists. Specialty Area Rugs: Loom Concepts. Floor tile: Pro Spec thru Pro Tile. Furniture: Dennis Miller, Design Within Reach, Odegard, Allan Knight Acrylic thru William Switzer. Furniture fabrics: Zimmer Rohde thru Jennifer West, Samuel & Sons, KnollTextiles.
For Morris & Co.—Wall merchandise system: Marlite. Decorative Fabrics: Carnegie. Decorative hardware: Hafele. Stone: Stone Source.Vertical Surfacing: Gage through Koroseal. Paint: Benjamin Moore. Plastic Laminate: Formica, Wilsonart. Special finish: Kinon. Wallcovering: Maya Romanoff. Humidor: Best Humidors.

where
Miami Beach, FL.




Hot Shops: Fontainebleau Hotel's Three Redesigned Shops by H DeVinn Visual and Mancini Duffy

09 August, 2010


Eric Laignel

Morris Lapidus famously said: “If you create a stage and it is grand, everyone who enters will play their part.” No one can deny that his most famous stage, the Fontainebleau Hotel in Miami Beach, is appropriately grand. Defiled by critics of the day as overly garish and flamboyant, the New York Times called it “inspired superschlock.” Yet it was embraced by the jet-setting public of the ’50s and ’60s, and its sexy, sweeping lines served as backdrop for such movies as “Goldfinger” and “Scarface.”

But like many icons of the day, the Fontainebleau, with its 17,000-sq.-ft. lobby and legendary “Staircase to Nowhere,” fell into disfavor. No longer playing host to celebrities like Elvis Presley and Judy Garland, the hotel quietly sat until the area’s resurgence in the ’80s and ’90s. In 2008 the Fontainebleau received a $1-billion expansion and face-lift, including three retail shops by H DeVinn Visual and Mancini • Duffy that recapture the Lapidus magic and reinterpret it for today.

Aquamarine is the lower level swim shop, set under one of the restaurant kitchens. The designers had to contend with mechanicals, grease traps, and pipes set above a low, accessible ceiling. “That space kept changing and shrinking,” recalls John Rawlins, director of interior design, H DeVinn Visual. Despite the limitations, Aquamarine still impresses with its Dorothy Draper-esque sensibility and features Thai silk curtains, mirrored panels, and a vintage Venini “starburst” chandelier. A Rococo mirror creates a focal point, while a white rubber Baroque armchair provides a restful spot for shoppers. The front door is pure glamour, reminiscent of a 1950s movie star dressing room entrance.

Ida and Harry is a shop that offers an eclectic array of exclusive designer clothing, shoes, and accessory brands. Named after one of the owner’s grandparents, the store’s undulating floor plan recalls the sweeping form of the hotel itself. “The wall of circular vitrines was inspired directly from Lapidus’ original design,” says DeVinn Bruce, creative director, H DeVinn Visual. “They are strong totems that we wanted to capture.” The hand-knotted carpets are reinterpretations of the original, while a set of lounge chairs and curvaceous benches are actually original Lapidus designs. Mirrored, mosaic-tile walls lend a lizard-skin effect. “It’s a graphic, bold space that pays homage to the 1950s but still is fresh and modern,” says Rawlins. Indeed, materials like LED lighting and translucent resins ground the space firmly in the present.

Sundries can be found at Morris & Co., a 495-sq.-ft. jewel box that features all of the notions, lotions, bits, and bobs one would expect in a hotel convenience store—but the similarities stop there. The high-end offerings and gifts are displayed like gems on polished chrome and white lacquer shelves. Even the usual sundry items receive special treatment with each tucked into one of 72 drawers of a custom apothecary table. “Usually that kind of merchandise is displayed on a pegboard, and it ends up a mess,” says Edward M. Calabrese, creative director, retail group, Mancini • Duffy. Silver mica chip wallcoverings, clusters of mercury glass, and cobalt-blue poured-terrazzo flooring surrounded by white marble that spills out into the lobby complete the space.

All of the shops walk that fine line between inspiration and imitation, a feature that Fontainebleau director of retail operations Brooke Soffer demanded from the beginning. “The retail needed to be in line with everything else in the space,” she recalls. “The three had to be cohesive but with each one still being able to stand on its own.” The stores are doing a great job of standing on their own, as each venue is in the black during this difficult economy, and there are plans to expand. “They are more than just a convenience to our 1,500 guests,” Soffer continues. “The shops have unique items that pull locals in as well as delighting savvy travelers.”

“They definitely look special; not like the management leased out a corner of the space to some random retailer,” says Calabrese. “Everyone’s eyes were on this project from the start, and I think it has surpassed expectations.”

It even fulfilled some wishes. “Lapidus is a personal hero of mine,” admits Rawlins. “He started in retail interiors like me, and when I was in college I stayed at the Fontainebleau. I like to think he would be happy with what we’ve done.”

who
Project: Shops at Fontainebleau Project team: H Devinn Visual, John Rawlins and Devinn Bruce, creative designers; Mancini Duffy Architecture Design Retail Group, Christine Wild, Project Manager, Aya Mizuguchi, technical support; Fontainebleau Resorts, Brooke Soffer, VP, retail, Kashia Orlando, director of retail. Lighting Designer: Lighting Workshop. Architect of record: BC Architects. General contractor: Brodson Construction. Millworkers: Horizon Millwork. Photography: Eric Laignel.

what
For Aquamarine—Wall merchandise system: Marlite. Decorative acrylic: Lightblocks. Decorative fabrics: Carnegie, Majilite, Clarence House. Paint: Benjamin Moore. Plastic Laminate: Formica, Wilsonart. Solid Surfacing: Corian. Decorative Wall surfacing: Maya Romanoff, Studio E. Wallcoverings: Carnegie. Furniture: Studio JSPR Netherlands, Oly Studio. Decorative Door Hardware: Nanz Hardware.
For Ida & Harry—Mosaic tiles: Sicis. Wall merchandise system: Marlite. Decorative Acrylic: LightBlocks, McKee Surfaces. Decorative hardware: Jamestown Furniture Hardware. Paint: Benjamin Moore. Plastic Laminate: Formica, Wilsonart. Solid surface: Corian. Wallcoverings: Graham & Brown, Maya Romanoff, Art People, Xorel, KnollTextiles. Wood Veneer: Tabu thru Veneer Specialists. Specialty Area Rugs: Loom Concepts. Floor tile: Pro Spec thru Pro Tile. Furniture: Dennis Miller, Design Within Reach, Odegard, Allan Knight Acrylic thru William Switzer. Furniture fabrics: Zimmer Rohde thru Jennifer West, Samuel & Sons, KnollTextiles.
For Morris & Co.—Wall merchandise system: Marlite. Decorative Fabrics: Carnegie. Decorative hardware: Hafele. Stone: Stone Source.Vertical Surfacing: Gage through Koroseal. Paint: Benjamin Moore. Plastic Laminate: Formica, Wilsonart. Special finish: Kinon. Wallcovering: Maya Romanoff. Humidor: Best Humidors.

where
Miami Beach, FL.

 


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