Contract - House of Sweet Dreams: Maison Moschino in Milan

design - features - hospitality design



House of Sweet Dreams: Maison Moschino in Milan

14 January, 2011

-By Danine Alati


Who could have imagined that an 1840s neoclassical railway station on Milan’s Viale Monte Grappa could so nicely convert into a high-end hotel? Apparently Rosella Jardini, creative director at Italian fashion house Moschino, had the foresight to envision how this space could transform into four-floor, 65-room Maison Moschino, a hotel with a unique design scheme that reflects surrealism and a flavor that is distinctively reflective of the Moschino brand.

Stefano Ugolini, founder and president of hotel management firm Hotelphilosophy, collaborated with Moschino’s Jardini, in cooperation with JoAnn Tan, on the design of this unique hospitality venture. “This project shares little with the other ‘fashion hotels,’” Ugolini says. “Our venture is the first where the interiors entirely are conceived by the label’s creative staff. I wanted to give birth to a hotel that takes the synergy between fashion and hotel design a step further.”

While the exterior façade was restored to remain true to its original 19th-century structure, the interior was completely renovated to meld fashion design and interior design with whimsical decor details that transport guests to a fantasy land of sorts. Upon entry, guests are struck by the influence of the fashion label with a famous, signature Moschino lampshade dress, which in this case actually works as a light to illuminate the entry hall where origami clouds are suspended from the ceiling. “When I enter, I feel as if I’m at home. Like all familiar places, its warm, welcoming atmosphere makes you feel protected,” Jardini says. “I’d love to preserve it just as it is, as if it were an installation, but I know that, by nature, it is destined to change. And yet I believe it will never betray its origins.”

Entering Maison Moschino, one might feel as though she stepped off the high-fashion street of Milan, into a high-style hotel that is reminiscent of a trip down the rabbit hole. And one of the suites actually is named “Alice’s Room,” with design references to Alice in Wonderland, including an occasional table with an oversized teacup base. The 16 different design themes for the 63 guestrooms and two junior suites range from “Little Red Riding Hood” and the Sweet Room with a Candyland motif, to the Gold, Blue, Forest, and Cloud rooms, to the “Life is a Bed of Roses” room with rose petals cascading from the chandelier and covering the bed. The “Sleeping in a Ballgown” rooms each feature beds with ballgowns draped over the headboard and flowing to the baseboard so that guests literally feel as though they are sleeping inside an enormous dress. And the Luxurious Attic room seems true to its name, with a set-up filled with boxes; yet it is surprisingly uncluttered with a spacious layout. On the whole, guestroom décor is kept spare, save for the one defining element that reflects the namesake of the room—be it ivy climbing the wall of the Ivy room; the multicolored ribbon-clad bedspread, chair, and pendant light in the Ribbon room; or the bumblebee and Z graphics in the Zzzzzzz room.

Designed with the intention of creating the embodiment of nocturnal fantasies, the whimsical nature of the guestrooms does not disappoint. “The common thread connecting the rooms is a fairy tale theme because to sleep is perchance to dream, and dreams are fairy tales that we are allowed to experience first hand, the fables of a fantasy world that we have created,” Jardini says.

Design details paying homage to signature Moschino fashions pop up throughout the public spaces. The bar area and restaurant Clandestino Milano in the ground floor connects the entry hall to the terrace. Additional lamps in the form of curvaceous dress silhouettes directly tie the restaurant interiors to with the Moschino theme, while a bar light is created from a stiletto boot. The tongue-in-cheek design nods are carried out in the inventive menu of Clandestino Milano, punctuated with an unusual palate-cleaning concoction of sake and mint-based “mouthwash.” And the “Mos Kit” breakfast treat is a choice of four, six, or eight combinations served in an elegant shoebox to relate back to the fashion theme. A lower-level spa and gym round out the design of this hotel that offers anything a guest could want in a luxury hospitality experience—and then some. “I had in mind an elegant and absolutely exclusive ambience that my guests could experience thoroughly,” notes Ugolini, “the kind of hotel you just die to tell your friends about.”

Jardini adds, “It is completely unlike other hotels, and it also has the courage to reveal the high-quality workmanship that built it. It’s a special place, which is why it’s called Maison Moschino.

The official Web site of the hotel sums up what awaits guests inside this unique hospitality experience: “Welcome to Maison Moschino, where four stars meet a few clouds—and the occasional teacup table, forest bedpost, and rose petal-covered bed.”

who
Project: Maison Moschino. Owner: Allianz insurance company. Architect: Strada Associato. Interior designer: Moschino; JoAnn Tan. Contractor, engineer: intertecno. Consultants: Moschino, Hotelphilosophy. Lighting: Moschino, Luceplan. Furniture dealer: Moschino, Cappellini, Poltrona Frau. Photographer: Massimo Listri, Åke E:son Lindman, and Martina Barberini

what
Wallcoverings: moschino. Lighting: Moschino, hotelplan. Doors: Lualdi. Cafeteria, dining, auditorium seating: Vitra, Dedra. Conference, cafeteria, dining, training, other tables; lounge seating: Moschino

where
Location: Milan, Italy. Total floor area: 3,000 sq. m. No. of floors: 6. Average floor size: 500. Total staff size: 50.




House of Sweet Dreams: Maison Moschino in Milan

14 January, 2011


Massimo Listri, Åke E:son Lindman, and Martina Barberini

Who could have imagined that an 1840s neoclassical railway station on Milan’s Viale Monte Grappa could so nicely convert into a high-end hotel? Apparently Rosella Jardini, creative director at Italian fashion house Moschino, had the foresight to envision how this space could transform into four-floor, 65-room Maison Moschino, a hotel with a unique design scheme that reflects surrealism and a flavor that is distinctively reflective of the Moschino brand.

Stefano Ugolini, founder and president of hotel management firm Hotelphilosophy, collaborated with Moschino’s Jardini, in cooperation with JoAnn Tan, on the design of this unique hospitality venture. “This project shares little with the other ‘fashion hotels,’” Ugolini says. “Our venture is the first where the interiors entirely are conceived by the label’s creative staff. I wanted to give birth to a hotel that takes the synergy between fashion and hotel design a step further.”

While the exterior façade was restored to remain true to its original 19th-century structure, the interior was completely renovated to meld fashion design and interior design with whimsical decor details that transport guests to a fantasy land of sorts. Upon entry, guests are struck by the influence of the fashion label with a famous, signature Moschino lampshade dress, which in this case actually works as a light to illuminate the entry hall where origami clouds are suspended from the ceiling. “When I enter, I feel as if I’m at home. Like all familiar places, its warm, welcoming atmosphere makes you feel protected,” Jardini says. “I’d love to preserve it just as it is, as if it were an installation, but I know that, by nature, it is destined to change. And yet I believe it will never betray its origins.”

Entering Maison Moschino, one might feel as though she stepped off the high-fashion street of Milan, into a high-style hotel that is reminiscent of a trip down the rabbit hole. And one of the suites actually is named “Alice’s Room,” with design references to Alice in Wonderland, including an occasional table with an oversized teacup base. The 16 different design themes for the 63 guestrooms and two junior suites range from “Little Red Riding Hood” and the Sweet Room with a Candyland motif, to the Gold, Blue, Forest, and Cloud rooms, to the “Life is a Bed of Roses” room with rose petals cascading from the chandelier and covering the bed. The “Sleeping in a Ballgown” rooms each feature beds with ballgowns draped over the headboard and flowing to the baseboard so that guests literally feel as though they are sleeping inside an enormous dress. And the Luxurious Attic room seems true to its name, with a set-up filled with boxes; yet it is surprisingly uncluttered with a spacious layout. On the whole, guestroom décor is kept spare, save for the one defining element that reflects the namesake of the room—be it ivy climbing the wall of the Ivy room; the multicolored ribbon-clad bedspread, chair, and pendant light in the Ribbon room; or the bumblebee and Z graphics in the Zzzzzzz room.

Designed with the intention of creating the embodiment of nocturnal fantasies, the whimsical nature of the guestrooms does not disappoint. “The common thread connecting the rooms is a fairy tale theme because to sleep is perchance to dream, and dreams are fairy tales that we are allowed to experience first hand, the fables of a fantasy world that we have created,” Jardini says.

Design details paying homage to signature Moschino fashions pop up throughout the public spaces. The bar area and restaurant Clandestino Milano in the ground floor connects the entry hall to the terrace. Additional lamps in the form of curvaceous dress silhouettes directly tie the restaurant interiors to with the Moschino theme, while a bar light is created from a stiletto boot. The tongue-in-cheek design nods are carried out in the inventive menu of Clandestino Milano, punctuated with an unusual palate-cleaning concoction of sake and mint-based “mouthwash.” And the “Mos Kit” breakfast treat is a choice of four, six, or eight combinations served in an elegant shoebox to relate back to the fashion theme. A lower-level spa and gym round out the design of this hotel that offers anything a guest could want in a luxury hospitality experience—and then some. “I had in mind an elegant and absolutely exclusive ambience that my guests could experience thoroughly,” notes Ugolini, “the kind of hotel you just die to tell your friends about.”

Jardini adds, “It is completely unlike other hotels, and it also has the courage to reveal the high-quality workmanship that built it. It’s a special place, which is why it’s called Maison Moschino.

The official Web site of the hotel sums up what awaits guests inside this unique hospitality experience: “Welcome to Maison Moschino, where four stars meet a few clouds—and the occasional teacup table, forest bedpost, and rose petal-covered bed.”

who
Project: Maison Moschino. Owner: Allianz insurance company. Architect: Strada Associato. Interior designer: Moschino; JoAnn Tan. Contractor, engineer: intertecno. Consultants: Moschino, Hotelphilosophy. Lighting: Moschino, Luceplan. Furniture dealer: Moschino, Cappellini, Poltrona Frau. Photographer: Massimo Listri, Åke E:son Lindman, and Martina Barberini

what
Wallcoverings: moschino. Lighting: Moschino, hotelplan. Doors: Lualdi. Cafeteria, dining, auditorium seating: Vitra, Dedra. Conference, cafeteria, dining, training, other tables; lounge seating: Moschino

where
Location: Milan, Italy. Total floor area: 3,000 sq. m. No. of floors: 6. Average floor size: 500. Total staff size: 50.

 


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