Contract - Making a Marc: Marc Jacobs, Tokyo, Designed by Jaklitsch / Gardner Architects

design - features - retail design



Making a Marc: Marc Jacobs, Tokyo, Designed by Jaklitsch / Gardner Architects

04 August, 2011

-By Jean Nayar


Standing elegantly, yet emphatically like a sleek exclamation point on a side street in Tokyo’s chic Omotesando area, the new Marc Jacobs flagship in the Japanese capital distinguishes itself from its flashier neighbors with a subtler, sophisticated profile. At the same time, the streamlined tripartite building is entirely at ease in its context. Designed by Stephan Jaklitsch, principal of New York–based Jaklitsch / Gardner Architects, the store is the most recent architectural expression of the Marc Jacobs brand, which Jaklitsch has refined over the course of a 12-year relationship with the company. The first freestanding emporium constructed for Marc Jacobs, it also graciously adapts the American designer’s brand to the polished Japanese market it caters to.

Framed by Cartier and Prada stores on one side and a residential area on the other, the 2,800-square-foot boutique needed to “straddle the two universes,” Jaklitsch says. “You’re looking down a street lined with retail monuments, Vuitton, Christian Dior—everyone’s built shops along this stretch and each is iconic,” the architect explains. To create a structure that would hold its own in this rarefied, hyper-stylish environment, the architect took advantage of a quirk in the area’s zoning regulations that limits the occupied portion of buildings in the neighborhood to two stories high. His solution: double the apparent height of the building by constructing a “ghost wall” along the roof’s perimeter.
 
Form as function

Departing from his original plan to create a monolithic structure, Jaklitsch opted instead to divide the vertical volume into three parts, characterizing each with distinct exterior materials—massive glass panels for the luminous accessories level at the base; jagged black terracotta tile for the women’s wear area on the second floor; and perforated aluminum cladding for the parallelogram-shaped structure at the top. Rather than using explicit signage on the aluminum panelling, the architect cut a faceted jewel-like pattern into them so that, when backlit at night, the building’s perceived height is elevated by its glittering crown. “It’s a more understated approach, and I think that’s truer to the Marc Jacobs brand,” says Jaklitsch, who
describes the composition of the building’s three parts visible from the street as “the void, the rock, and the lantern.”

The striking yet understated exterior was consciously crafted to draw attention on several levels. “Our riff on the materials was used as a strategy to entice customers in,” says Jaklitsch. In addition to defining the different zones within the volume, the varied mix of exterior surfaces reflects the brand’s signature black and white palette, shaping the character of the building from a distance and luring in passersby from the street. The architect relied on materials to create a seamless transition from the outside in, too. A flamed granite sidewalk surrounding the building, for example, extends from the curb and continues inside the store as ground-level flooring, blurring the distinction between the interiors and the street. Following the same train of thought, the architect used 10½-foot-high panes of optical glass—installed without mullions—to achieve a sense of transparency and visually connect the outside to the ground floor. Contrasting interior materials add to the allure from the street. Counterpoints to the black and silver materials and angular form of the building shell, a glowing oval cash wrap and illuminated shelving of white Corian highlight the accessories and handbags awaiting customers just beyond the entrance.

Creating comfort zones

Once inside, a further shift in palette and forms offers an increasing sense of intimacy as customers move deeper into the spaces. The flamed granite on the floor, for instance, contrasts with East Indian laurel wood on the staircase that leads to the women’s area upstairs and the men’s below. These wooden stair treads transition into wall-to-wall carpeting on the ready-to-wear levels, and—in contrast to the main floor’s crisp white Corian shelves—display units are made of warm sycamore. A thoughtful selection of plush leather sofas and benches by Christian Liaigre and custom light fixtures add to the soothing residential atmosphere in these spaces. “We wanted a comfortable living room feel that would welcome people to linger,” says the architect.

While material, color, and furnishings selections reinforce the Marc Jacobs brand, the configuration of the spaces was adapted to suit Japanese sensibilities. The women’s area, for one, is situated on the second floor, creating as much distance as possible from the men’s area located in space carved below grade. The architect also positioned the second-floor windows to face the building’s sides rather than the street to offer more privacy, shielding the women’s wear section from view outside.

Since designing his first Marc Jacobs store in San Francisco in 1999, Jaklitsch has worked on almost 300 of the brand’s stores in other parts of the country and the world. Collaborating closely with Robert Duffy, president and vice chairman of Marc Jacobs International, has allowed him to continually hone the brand language while adapting it to specific locations and new merchandise and segment additions as the brand has evolved. “Robert [Duffy] has always looked for a strong voice that he can react to—and from day one, he’s been most curious about the things he wasn’t expecting,” says Jaklitsch, who sees his client’s openness to new ideas as key to keeping the store designs fresh. And the new Japanese flagship store represents an elegant extension to the array of architectural identities that define the brand. 

Photography by Architectural Imageworks

SOURCE LIST

What
Marc Jacobs. Architect Jaklitsch / Gardner Architects PC. Client Marc Jacobs Japan K.K. (building tenant), Veloqx Asset Management, Corp. (building owner). Where Tokyo, Japan. What 2,800 total square feet on three floors. Cost/sf Withheld at client’s request.

Who
Architect and interior designer: Jaklitsch / Gardner Architects PC. Architecture project team: Stephan Jaklitsch, AIA, principal; Mark Gardner, AIA, LEED AP, principal; Jonathan Kirk, Associate AIA, project architect; Bronson Fung, designer; Toshi Hirai, designer; Palmer Thompson-Moss, designer. Contractor: Kitano Construction Corp. (shell); D. Brain Co., Ltd. (interiors). Architect of record: Creative Designers International (core and shell); D. Brain Co. Ltd. (interiors). Lighting consultant: L’Observatoire
International.

What
Paint: Benjamin Moore. Interior lighting: Axon Lighting (second-level custom pendant fixtures, basement custom wall sconce); NIPPO (fluorescents); Moriyama Sangyo (LED). Exterior lighting: Winona LED. Lounge furnishings: Christian Liaigre (sofas, benches, custom upholstery, cocktail table). Custom shelving and woodwork: Jaklitsch / Gardner Architects PC.




Making a Marc: Marc Jacobs, Tokyo, Designed by Jaklitsch / Gardner Architects

04 August, 2011


Architectural Imageworks

Standing elegantly, yet emphatically like a sleek exclamation point on a side street in Tokyo’s chic Omotesando area, the new Marc Jacobs flagship in the Japanese capital distinguishes itself from its flashier neighbors with a subtler, sophisticated profile. At the same time, the streamlined tripartite building is entirely at ease in its context. Designed by Stephan Jaklitsch, principal of New York–based Jaklitsch / Gardner Architects, the store is the most recent architectural expression of the Marc Jacobs brand, which Jaklitsch has refined over the course of a 12-year relationship with the company. The first freestanding emporium constructed for Marc Jacobs, it also graciously adapts the American designer’s brand to the polished Japanese market it caters to.

Framed by Cartier and Prada stores on one side and a residential area on the other, the 2,800-square-foot boutique needed to “straddle the two universes,” Jaklitsch says. “You’re looking down a street lined with retail monuments, Vuitton, Christian Dior—everyone’s built shops along this stretch and each is iconic,” the architect explains. To create a structure that would hold its own in this rarefied, hyper-stylish environment, the architect took advantage of a quirk in the area’s zoning regulations that limits the occupied portion of buildings in the neighborhood to two stories high. His solution: double the apparent height of the building by constructing a “ghost wall” along the roof’s perimeter.
 
Form as function

Departing from his original plan to create a monolithic structure, Jaklitsch opted instead to divide the vertical volume into three parts, characterizing each with distinct exterior materials—massive glass panels for the luminous accessories level at the base; jagged black terracotta tile for the women’s wear area on the second floor; and perforated aluminum cladding for the parallelogram-shaped structure at the top. Rather than using explicit signage on the aluminum panelling, the architect cut a faceted jewel-like pattern into them so that, when backlit at night, the building’s perceived height is elevated by its glittering crown. “It’s a more understated approach, and I think that’s truer to the Marc Jacobs brand,” says Jaklitsch, who
describes the composition of the building’s three parts visible from the street as “the void, the rock, and the lantern.”

The striking yet understated exterior was consciously crafted to draw attention on several levels. “Our riff on the materials was used as a strategy to entice customers in,” says Jaklitsch. In addition to defining the different zones within the volume, the varied mix of exterior surfaces reflects the brand’s signature black and white palette, shaping the character of the building from a distance and luring in passersby from the street. The architect relied on materials to create a seamless transition from the outside in, too. A flamed granite sidewalk surrounding the building, for example, extends from the curb and continues inside the store as ground-level flooring, blurring the distinction between the interiors and the street. Following the same train of thought, the architect used 10½-foot-high panes of optical glass—installed without mullions—to achieve a sense of transparency and visually connect the outside to the ground floor. Contrasting interior materials add to the allure from the street. Counterpoints to the black and silver materials and angular form of the building shell, a glowing oval cash wrap and illuminated shelving of white Corian highlight the accessories and handbags awaiting customers just beyond the entrance.

Creating comfort zones

Once inside, a further shift in palette and forms offers an increasing sense of intimacy as customers move deeper into the spaces. The flamed granite on the floor, for instance, contrasts with East Indian laurel wood on the staircase that leads to the women’s area upstairs and the men’s below. These wooden stair treads transition into wall-to-wall carpeting on the ready-to-wear levels, and—in contrast to the main floor’s crisp white Corian shelves—display units are made of warm sycamore. A thoughtful selection of plush leather sofas and benches by Christian Liaigre and custom light fixtures add to the soothing residential atmosphere in these spaces. “We wanted a comfortable living room feel that would welcome people to linger,” says the architect.

While material, color, and furnishings selections reinforce the Marc Jacobs brand, the configuration of the spaces was adapted to suit Japanese sensibilities. The women’s area, for one, is situated on the second floor, creating as much distance as possible from the men’s area located in space carved below grade. The architect also positioned the second-floor windows to face the building’s sides rather than the street to offer more privacy, shielding the women’s wear section from view outside.

Since designing his first Marc Jacobs store in San Francisco in 1999, Jaklitsch has worked on almost 300 of the brand’s stores in other parts of the country and the world. Collaborating closely with Robert Duffy, president and vice chairman of Marc Jacobs International, has allowed him to continually hone the brand language while adapting it to specific locations and new merchandise and segment additions as the brand has evolved. “Robert [Duffy] has always looked for a strong voice that he can react to—and from day one, he’s been most curious about the things he wasn’t expecting,” says Jaklitsch, who sees his client’s openness to new ideas as key to keeping the store designs fresh. And the new Japanese flagship store represents an elegant extension to the array of architectural identities that define the brand. 

Photography by Architectural Imageworks

SOURCE LIST

What
Marc Jacobs. Architect Jaklitsch / Gardner Architects PC. Client Marc Jacobs Japan K.K. (building tenant), Veloqx Asset Management, Corp. (building owner). Where Tokyo, Japan. What 2,800 total square feet on three floors. Cost/sf Withheld at client’s request.

Who
Architect and interior designer: Jaklitsch / Gardner Architects PC. Architecture project team: Stephan Jaklitsch, AIA, principal; Mark Gardner, AIA, LEED AP, principal; Jonathan Kirk, Associate AIA, project architect; Bronson Fung, designer; Toshi Hirai, designer; Palmer Thompson-Moss, designer. Contractor: Kitano Construction Corp. (shell); D. Brain Co., Ltd. (interiors). Architect of record: Creative Designers International (core and shell); D. Brain Co. Ltd. (interiors). Lighting consultant: L’Observatoire
International.

What
Paint: Benjamin Moore. Interior lighting: Axon Lighting (second-level custom pendant fixtures, basement custom wall sconce); NIPPO (fluorescents); Moriyama Sangyo (LED). Exterior lighting: Winona LED. Lounge furnishings: Christian Liaigre (sofas, benches, custom upholstery, cocktail table). Custom shelving and woodwork: Jaklitsch / Gardner Architects PC.

 


Post a Comment
Asterisk (*) is a required field.
*Username: 
*Rate This Article: (1=Bad, 5=Perfect)

*Comment:
 




follow us

advertisement


advertisement






advertisement


advertisement




Contract Magazine is devoted to highlighting creative interior design trends and ideas that are shaping the industry on a daily basis. Contract is proud to provide you with the most comprehensive coverage of commercial interior design products and resources that procure uniqueness when designing a space. Contract is the modern interior design magazine that recognizes fresh interior design ideas and projects powerful interior design resources.

 

Contract Magazine Home | Interior Design News | Interior Planning Products | Interior Design Research | Interior Design Competitions | Interior Design Resources | Interactive Interior Designing | Digital/Print Versions | Newsletter | About Us | Contact Us | Advertising Opportunities | Subscriber FAQs | RSS | Sitemap

© Emerald Expositions 2014. All rights reserved. Terms of Use | Privacy Policy