House of Culture and Movement, Designed by MVRDV and ADEPT

House of Culture and Movement, Designed by MVRDV and ADEPT
Apr 28, 2011 The colaborative design for a new, multi-purpose building—housing health, leisure, culture and education facilities—will take center stage in the City of Frederiksberg, Denmark
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House of Culture and Movement, Designed by MVRDV and ADEPT_01 The project, which is adequately named the House of Culture and Movement and still in its concept phase, is set to be built within Copenhagen near the Flintholm metro station.
House of Culture and Movement, Designed by MVRDV and ADEPT_02 It originally was conceived by the two firms in response to a design competition launched by Realdania (a foundation goaled toward improving the quality of life through projects for the built environment), Copenhagen, and The Danish Foundation for Culture and Sports Facilities, which are co-funding the realization of the facility.
House of Culture and Movement, Designed by MVRDV and ADEPT_03 The House of Culture and Movement will be divided into a multi-phase build—the House, the garden (designed by SLA), and the urban curtain, which surrounds both the House and the garden.
House of Culture and Movement, Designed by MVRDV and ADEPT_04 The main building, the House of Culture and Movement, or Ku-Be (Kultur-og Bevægelseshus) features a three-story, rectangular glass structure that contains six distinct program elements—a theater (which is flexible for variable audience and performance settings, including an open-air extension to the garden exterior), a health zone, a food zone, a Zen area, a study center and exhibition hall, a fitness and activity center, a wellness center, and an administrative area.

(Theater/performance zone pictured)

House of Culture and Movement, Designed by MVRDV and ADEPT_05 Each zone will host a specific spatial identity, with necessary acoustic and environmental conditions.

(Health zone pictured)

House of Culture and Movement, Designed by MVRDV and ADEPT_06 “It is an enclosed and climatized “micro-cosmos” with designated zones in which a wide range of activities can be enjoyed,” says Martin Krogh, founding partner of ADEPT. “The zones are standalones, but positioned in such a way that interaction can easily be orchestrated.”

(Food zone pictured)

House of Culture and Movement, Designed by MVRDV and ADEPT_07 “It is an enclosed and climatized “micro-cosmos” with designated zones in which a wide range of activities can be enjoyed,” says Martin Krogh, founding partner of ADEPT. “The zones are standalones, but positioned in such a way that interaction can easily be orchestrated.”

 

(Zen area pictured)

House of Culture and Movement, Designed by MVRDV and ADEPT_08 Adding to this strategic positioning are the zone’s adjoining “in-between” spaces, which link the separate function areas together, and serve as “play zones.”

 

(Play zone pictured)

House of Culture and Movement, Designed by MVRDV and ADEPT_09 It is here, that Krogh says that “unexpected encounters between different people and activities can occur and major events and space consuming ideas can be realized.” Flexible furniture will help the space.

 

(Administration area pictured)

House of Culture and Movement, Designed by MVRDV and ADEPT_10 The House will be wrapped within an “urban curtain” that will surround and frame the outside garden site, which offers flexible space for art exhibitions, parking for bicycles, performances, and other water and light installations. "It’s a building that is transcending its boundaries as a spectacular urban park that will bring liveliness and excitement to the neighborhood,” Krogh says. MVRDV and ADEPT closely worked with landscape architects SLA to translate the themes of the House interior to the garden, incorporating health and activity zones, including a quiet zone.
House of Culture and Movement, Designed by MVRDV and ADEPT_11 “We are quite specific in our desire to maximize the relationship between the interior and the exterior of the development. This is an exciting challenge,” says Krough, who describes that the transparent façade of the main House building is the key to achieving this interconnectivity. “We always work with ideas of the city when developing projects. This cultural building is—hopefully—an example of this approach.”