KLF Architectural Systems Office, Springfield, Missouri, Designed by Dake Wells Architecture
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KLF Architectural Systems Office, Springfield, Missouri, Designed by Dake Wells Architecture
Jul 29, 2011 With both refined and workmanlike materials and careful consideration, Dake Wells Architecture elevates the form and function of KLF Architectural Systems’ compact office/showroom space

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KLF Architectural Systems Office, Springfield, Missouri, Designed by Dake Wells Architecture_01 The blue ribbon-like wall that swoops through the space, calls to mind the extruded aluminum products that KLF supplies to its clients. The wall organizes the space by separating the client zone on the left from the office zone on the right. Cove lighting above and below the reception desk produces a soft glow at the entrance. Against the tenant demising wall, a sheet of glass contains a layer of aluminum shavings recycled from KLF’s plant.
KLF Architectural Systems Office, Springfield, Missouri, Designed by Dake Wells Architecture_02 Made of the same material used to create KLF’s storefront systems, the conference table is lit by  a 40-foot-long pendant fixture and surrounded by Herman Miller chairs.
KLF Architectural Systems Office, Springfield, Missouri, Designed by Dake Wells Architecture_03 A glass-enclosed office allows employees to look out into the rest of the interior.
KLF Architectural Systems Office, Springfield, Missouri, Designed by Dake Wells Architecture_04 A sliding door made of pegboard closes off the back-of-office workroom, which is used for reading large-scale plans and working drawings. Backlit pegboard panels, mounted along one side of the space in a saw-tooth pattern, serve as project display surfaces and complement the polished concrete floor. On the right, a partition made of 1-in. sections of extruded aluminum screens the work areas from the conference area beyond yet still allows a sense of transparency between the two sides of the long, narrow space.