The Daylight Imperative by Eva Behringer

The Daylight Imperative by Eva Behringer
Sep 29, 2011 A thesis proposal for the Montgomery Hospital replacement project in Norristown, Pennsylvania, challenges notions of dense urban site plans to create a hospital that successfully integrates daylighting strategies.
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The Daylight Imperative by Eva Behringer_01 Most primary staff working areas have access to daylight and views outside within 15 to 20 feet of their primary station. To ensure optimal visual performance, especially crucial for the work needed in urgent care, shading devices diffuse the incoming light to reduce glare and distraction.
The Daylight Imperative by Eva Behringer_02 Sliding shutters on the eastern facing facade provide protection against heat gain and glazing. The overhang helps to control sun exposure.
The Daylight Imperative by Eva Behringer_03 The main spine is shown here with clerestories toward the central courtyard. Individual shading strategies (the vertical slating on the building in the foreground) are provided for each direction to optimize efficiency. A small, tan-hued building (right) serves as an outpatient clinic and maintains a narrow footprint.
The Daylight Imperative by Eva Behringer_04 The main circulation areas have visual connections to the outside for wayfinding, and is fully glazed on the northern facade. Clerestories of public space on the ground floor face south and support a clinic-without-walls concept. Glass frittings provide privacy and sun control.
The Daylight Imperative by Eva Behringer_05 Overhangs on the soutern facade provide protection against heat gain and glare, while enclosed courtyards provide access to daylight and views of nature.