George Nelson at the Cranbrook Art Museum
courtesy Vitra Design Museum
George Nelson at the Cranbrook Art Museum
Aug 27, 2012
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George Nelson at the Cranbrook Art Museum_01 Nelson_10 George Nelson poses for the Herman Miller advert “Traveling Men”, circa 1954.

Photography Vitra Design Museum Archive

 
George Nelson at the Cranbrook Art Museum_02 Nelson_05 "George Nelson: Architect | Designer | Writer | Teacher" will be on view at the Cranbrook Art Museum until October 14 before making its final stop in the U.S. at the Yale University Art Gallery.

Photographer Mark Baker



 
George Nelson at the Cranbrook Art Museum_03 Nelson_01 Cranbrook Art Museum is the exhibition's third stop in the U.S., originating from the Vitra Design Museum in Germany.

Photography Mark Baker

George Nelson at the Cranbrook Art Museum_04 Nelson_07 The exhibition features furniture designed by Nelson, and includes iconic pieces like the Marshmallow Sofa (pictured at bottom right). 

Photography Mark Baker

George Nelson at the Cranbrook Art Museum_05 Nelson_06 "We have a great space for work that deals with midcentury modernism," says Greg Wittkopp, director of the Cranbrook Art Museum.

Photography Mark Baker
George Nelson at the Cranbrook Art Museum_06 Nelson_09 Director of the Cranbrook Art Museum, Gregg Wittkopp cites pieces like Nelson's wall clocks as strong representations of the thought and consideration of context that went into George Nelson's designs.

Photography courtesy Vitra Design Museum Archive
George Nelson at the Cranbrook Art Museum_07 Nelson_02 Nelson's clocks resulted from a change in the way Americans told time after WWII. "No one used wall clocks and they were no longer critical to map the course of a day," explains Greg Wittkopp, director of the Cranbrook Art Museum. Based on this observation, he found the numbers were not the telling element of reading time, but rather it is the position of the clock's hands, and so designed wall clocks with dashes or symbols to note placement.

Photography Mark Baker
George Nelson at the Cranbrook Art Museum_08 Nelson_03 A featured piece in the exhibition is the Storage Wall, which was originally profiled in his best-selling book Tomorrow's House, coauthored with Henry Wright. 

Photography Mark Baker
George Nelson at the Cranbrook Art Museum_09 Nelson_08 Swaged Leg Group by George Nelson
Swaged Leg Desk (1958) and Swaged Leg Chair (1954)

Photography courtesy Vitra Design Museum Archive