Contract - Herman Miller Research Reveals how Place Affects Learning

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Herman Miller Research Reveals how Place Affects Learning

06 December, 2011


For the past four years, Herman Miller has been collaborating with students and faculty on more than 25 campuses as part of their Learning Spaces Research Program (LSRP).

The program took Higher Education classrooms and transformed them into Learning Studios with designed elements believed by Herman Miller to be essential for powerful learning. Participating campuses were given the opportunity to experience the new learning space design concept, while research was simultaneously conducted to measure the impact of the classroom design on students and faculty.

An analysis of approximately 3,000 total responses from twelve of the campuses revealed response patterns that categorized students into three types: students who Like the Classroom, Dislike the Classroom, and who think the Classroom is Fine. The study found an overall strong movement of students into the Like the Classroom group post-implementation, with a net movement of 18 percent.

Other interesting findings included a shift in the identified grade level majority of other students in the classroom. Post-implementation groups unanimously felt that the Learning Studio provided “No Difference in Grade Levels,” suggesting a more cohesive classroom.

Analysis also revealed that the new environment made students feel more comfortable asking questions and participating in discussions. The results showed that from pre- to post-implementation, students felt more comfortable by 4 percent.

Additionally, students viewed the Learning Studio more positively than the traditional classroom in the following themes:
• Flexibility of Space, Collaboration/Communication and Sense of Community
• Core Adjustments
• Lecture Teaching Methods
• Progressive Teaching Methods
• Satisfaction
• Limitations


Faculty data revealed a significant percentage increase or decrease in favor of the Learning Studio across almost all themes, including:
• Assessment of Design
• Satisfaction
• Flexibility of Space
• Collaboration and Communication
• Sense of Community
• Limitations
• Engagement

Overall, the research revealed that students and faculty viewed the new design more positively than the traditional classroom.

To view the complete Research Summary, click here.




Herman Miller Research Reveals how Place Affects Learning

06 December, 2011


For the past four years, Herman Miller has been collaborating with students and faculty on more than 25 campuses as part of their Learning Spaces Research Program (LSRP).

The program took Higher Education classrooms and transformed them into Learning Studios with designed elements believed by Herman Miller to be essential for powerful learning. Participating campuses were given the opportunity to experience the new learning space design concept, while research was simultaneously conducted to measure the impact of the classroom design on students and faculty.

An analysis of approximately 3,000 total responses from twelve of the campuses revealed response patterns that categorized students into three types: students who Like the Classroom, Dislike the Classroom, and who think the Classroom is Fine. The study found an overall strong movement of students into the Like the Classroom group post-implementation, with a net movement of 18 percent.

Other interesting findings included a shift in the identified grade level majority of other students in the classroom. Post-implementation groups unanimously felt that the Learning Studio provided “No Difference in Grade Levels,” suggesting a more cohesive classroom.

Analysis also revealed that the new environment made students feel more comfortable asking questions and participating in discussions. The results showed that from pre- to post-implementation, students felt more comfortable by 4 percent.

Additionally, students viewed the Learning Studio more positively than the traditional classroom in the following themes:
• Flexibility of Space, Collaboration/Communication and Sense of Community
• Core Adjustments
• Lecture Teaching Methods
• Progressive Teaching Methods
• Satisfaction
• Limitations


Faculty data revealed a significant percentage increase or decrease in favor of the Learning Studio across almost all themes, including:
• Assessment of Design
• Satisfaction
• Flexibility of Space
• Collaboration and Communication
• Sense of Community
• Limitations
• Engagement

Overall, the research revealed that students and faculty viewed the new design more positively than the traditional classroom.

To view the complete Research Summary, click here.

 


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